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Thyroid issue may be contributing to your weight gain

April 21, 2016

SIGNS YOU MAY HAVE A THYROID DISORDER:

1. FATIGUE

Fatigue is a symptom that generally encompasses feelings of tiredness and exhaustion. Hypothyroidism – low levels of thyroid hormones in the blood – may be a potential cause of fatigue. Consistent feelings of tiredness are often diagnosed as symptoms of chronic fatigue, which may also be a symptom of a thyroid disorder. In other cases, fatigue as a symptom may be quite subtle in nature.

2. WEIGHT GAIN

A sudden, unexplainable gain in weight can be a telltale sign of a thyroid condition. Generally, weight gain is the byproduct of low levels of thyroid hormones (hypothyroidism).  Conversely, elevated levels of thyroid hormone, called hyperthyroidism, may cause unanticipated periods of weight loss. Of the two disorders, hypothyroidism is far more common.

3. IRREGULAR HEART RATE

As mentioned, thyroid hormones affect a number of vital organs. When thyroid hormone levels are too low, this may cause the heart to beat too slow. When hormonal levels are elevated, heart rate may become uncharacteristically fast. As a result, one’s blood pressure levels often become erratic. Sometimes, alterations in heart rate create noticeable sensations, such as a pounding heart or heart palpitations.

4. SWELLING OF THE NECK

Contrary to most signs of a thyroid disorder, swelling of the neck is often a very noticeable symptom. This is one particular sign that demands immediate attention, as it may be the result of thyroid cancer or nodules, small lumps that grow within the thyroid. Of course, other conditions exist that may be responsible for swelling of the neck.

5. DEPRESSION

Surprisingly, depression may be one sign of a thyroid disorder. The reason is that hypothyroidism can impact levels of the brain’s “feel good” chemical, serotonin. Also, low levels of thyroid hormone can trigger other areas of the body to decrease activity, which may have an indirect impact on overall mood.

6. ANXIETY OR JITTERINESS

This is one sign that may be due to hyperthyroidism – when the thyroid gland is producing an excessive level of hormones. When this occurs, our metabolism and other parts of the body may become hyperactive, creating feelings of anxiety or general “jitteriness”.

7. BRAIN FOG

When thyroid functionality diminishes, cognitive ability often does as well. Hyperthyroidism often makes it difficult to concentrate, while hypothyroidism may create lapses in memory and decreased awareness. Notably, some women have attributed such signs to menopause, when the root cause was actually a thyroid condition.

8. DECREASED SEX DRIVE

This sign can be a standalone or a cumulative symptom. Low libido can be the direct result of hypothyroidism, but other signs – low energy, body aches, weight gain – caused by hypothyroidism may also be to blame.

9. DRY SKIN

In addition to swelling of the neck, dry skin may be another noticeable sign of a thyroid disorder. Hypothyroidism often slows metabolism, which can initiate changes in both skin texture and appearance. Further, an inactive metabolism often reduces sweating which limits the amount of skin moisture, causing flakiness or dryness. Also, nails may become brittle as well.

10. IRREGULAR DIGESTION

Those with hypothyroidism often complain of constipation, a likely result of decreased digestive activity from lowered hormonal production. On the flip side, hyperthyroidism or an overactive thyroid may result in bouts of diarrhea or more frequent bowel movements.

Natural Remedies For Thyroid issues

Making dietary changes is your first line of defense in treating hypothyroidism. Many people with hypothyroidism experience crippling fatigue and brain fog, which prompts reaching for non-nutritional forms of energy like sugar and caffeine. I’ve dubbed these rascals the terrible twosome, as they can burn out your thyroid (and destabilize blood sugar).

1. Just say no to the dietary bungee cord. Greatly reduce or eliminate caffeine and sugar, including refined carbohydrates like flour, which the body treats like sugar. Make grain-based carbohydrates lesser of a focus, eating non-starchy vegetables to your heart’s content.

2. Up the protein. Protein transports thyroid hormone to all your tissues and enjoying it at each meal can help normalize thyroid function. Proteins include nuts and nut butters; quinoa; hormone- and antibiotic-free animal products (organic, grass-fed meats, eggs, and sustainably-farmed fish); and legumes.

3. Get fat. Fat is your friend and cholesterol is the precursor to hormonal pathways; if you’re getting insufficient fat and cholesterol, you could be exacerbating hormonal imbalance, which includes thyroid hormones. Natural, healthful fats include olive oil; ghee; avocados; flax seeds; fish; nuts and nut butters; hormone- and antibiotic-free full fat cheese, yogurt, and cottage cheese (yes, full fat, not skim); and coconut milk products.

4. Nutrient-up. While nutritional deficiencies may not be the cause of hypothyroidism, not having enough of these micronutrients and minerals can aggravate symptoms: vitamin D, iron, omega-3 fatty acids, selenium, zinc, copper, vitamin A, the B vitamins, and iodine.

5. Go 100% gluten-free. The molecular composition of thyroid tissue is almost identical to that of gluten. So for those with Hashimoto’s, it’s a case of mistaken identity. Eating gluten can increase the autoimmune attack on your thyroid.

6. Be mindful of goitrogens, which are foods that can interfere with thyroid function. Goitrogens include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, rutabaga, turnips, millet, spinach, strawberries, peaches, watercress, peanuts, radishes, and soybeans. Does it mean that you can never eat these foods? No, because cooking inactivates goitrogenic compounds and eating radishes and watercress in moderation isn’t going to be a deal-breaker.

7. Address underlying food sensitivities. Just like the body’s attack on the thyroid in the presence of Hashimoto’s, the body will also see offending or inflammatory foods as an invader and will up the ante on the autoimmune response.

10. Do a gut check. A whopping 20 percent of thyroid function depends on a sufficient supply of healthy gut bacteria, so it’s best to supplement with probiotics (friendly intestinal bacteria).

11. Address silent inflammation with whole foods nutrition. Systemic inflammation and autoimmunity often go hand-in-hand.

12. Address adrenal fatigue. There is an intimate connection between your thyroid and adrenal glands and it’s uncommon to have hypothyroidism without some level of adrenal fatigue. The thyroid and adrenals are like Frick and Frack – so tightly in cahoots that it’s not effective to address one without the other.

12. Look at your stressors and practice relaxation. The thyroid is a very sensitive gland and is exceptionally reactive to the stress response.

13. Ask for the thyroid collar. The thyroid is sensitive to radiation, so next time you’re getting an x-ray at the dentist, ask for the thyroid collar. Do not let your thyroid get zapped!

Source: http://www.davidwolfe.com/ , http://www.mindbodygreen.com/

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